Matthew Chak, director of and client services at Hong Kong-based X2 Creative, says that facial-recognition technology is important from a data analytics point of view.

“Event professionals do need to capture data and gauge levels of guest engagement for evaluation and measurement, which can be done through the technology,” he says.

“This greatly helps us to know the gender and age of the guests, and even their facial expressions, whether they are ‘having fun’ with the engagement.”

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While facial recognition can prove to be a powerful tool for event professionals, Chak believes the cost is still an obstacle—along with potential privacy concerns from guests.

“There is still no industry-level protocol in handling and storing this data, which could prove risky to organisers with limited liability protections or systems in place,”
he says.

Marina Saya, group marketing communication coordinator at global AV provider Dorier Group, says that while facial recognition software is part of our daily lives, there has not yet been a significant breakthrough for the event industry.

“We would not really bet on facial recognition as a future technology at events,” she says. “The only added value would be enhancing the security of a sensitive political or institutional event, gathering high-profile and exposed speakers and attendees.”

Imagination’s managing director in Hong Kong, Chris Dobson, is also not convinced that, as an element of the overall customer experience, the value exchange is there yet.

“Perhaps once the technology becomes more prevalent in the world around us some barriers will drop, and new use cases emerge, but it
is not something I see client or customer appetite for at the moment,” he says. 

Image source: New Scientist