Story telling becomes ‘story living’

The growth of live-streaming and 360-degree videos on the likes of Facebook and YouTube in the last year has highlighted the demand for experiential consumer engagement online, says Catherine Schueler, group sales director at AV solutions provider Dorier Group.

“By enabling consumers to engage with a live event as and when they choose, in both the physical and digital landscapes, brands have the ability to create a highly personalised, on-demand experience,” she says. “The key to successful ‘story living’ is meaningful and simple content, either useful or entertaining, triggering emotions to enhance the experience.”

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The ‘festivalisation’ of events

With today’s event attendees more discerning than ever before, the pressure is on to provide multi-format, multi-sensory and content-rich platforms, an event format that SingEx Holdings CEO, Aloysius Arlando, describes as ‘festivalisation’. “This entails significant thinking in designing the programme— offering varying formats such as master classes, start-up alleys, huddle corners, mobile apps and other innovative experiential touchpoints—it can no longer be an after thought.”

Microsoft’s HoloLens

Jed Mok, general manager, creative and strategy planning at Pico Singapore, believes Microsoft’s HoloLens (pictured)—an AR headset with a built-in processor that runs custom apps allowing multiple users to look at and manipulate the same hologram in real time, has plenty of scope for use in our world. “It’s a game-changer in immersive presentation,” he says.

“Agencies and their clients can now look at the same 3D hologram of an exhibition booth or stage set design at the same time. The agency can manipulate the hologram by rotating or zooming into a specific section to explain their design, and the client can do the same to have their questions answered. “The hologram can also be scaled up to one-to-one proportions, allowing the viewers to ‘walk inside’.”

Incorporate technology

When you weave technology through an event or experience, says Chris Dobson, Imagination Hong Kong MD, you are not just giving yourself a whole new set of engagement and storytelling tools, you are extending its life—giving people the chance to take away moments, enjoy and share. “You are also generating data, increasing the ability to measure ROI and effectiveness of the spend,” he says.

Engage with the right tools

You don’t need to be an expert with every tool in the shed, but should understand what they do and how they work. Robert Rogers, event designer and principal at Events Man, says planners will use tried and trusted tools when often it is about rethinking elements to achieve the desired purpose. “Recently at a ‘passion’-themed event, instead of traditional ‘men in dark suits’ we used dancers dressed as sirens to ‘call’ attendees to the registration area,” he says.